Lunar Knights Review

Lunar Knights Review

The fact that a game fails to attract widespread acclaim and financial success because of how original or unique it is happens much more often than most gamers would like to believe. Either the game falls into obscurity or it is overhauled to some degree to the point where it will be more accessible to a general consumer populous and thus garner the attention the original should have. The latter is much more uncommon, but nonetheless that is the basic story of the development Konami’s Lunar Knights. Formerly known as Boktai, Lunar Knights is the third installment of the series that has its roots on the Game Boy Advance. While the series ultimate loses what made it unique (Boktai: The Sun Is In Your Hand and Boktai 2: Solar Boy Django), the sun sensor, it still manages to retain its game play and thus remains a good title.
The basic premise of Lunar Knights sets you up in a world which is firmly in the control of vampires and by that humankind has been kicked down a notch on the proverbial food chain. The sun being blocked out and various other elements have made the only resistance a small guide. You’ll be introduced to two characters, both of which you’ll inevitably control and use to combat the vampires that are in power. Both characters have their own strengths and you’ll switch between the two to gain the advantage over a particular enemy. Whereas most games lack a decent script or writing in general, Lunar Knights manages to be believable in nearly every aspect even when you consider the fact that it’s an anime based vampire hunter game with space combat thrown into the mix.

The game plays like a dungeon crawler but manages to stray away from weaker titles in that series in that it’s enjoyable. Switching characters is a quick process and recharging weapons (as you’ll have to do to stay at your best) can. Oddly enough after boss battles you’ll have to engage in a space battle. It feels abrupt and out of place, and it’s not really easy to get into if you’re not a fan of space shooters. The new turn the series had taken also strays from the puzzle elements that were featured in the first two games, which clearly makes it more action packed.

The graphics are good but aren’t anything extraordinary, however the cut-scenes are exceptional. The music is also pretty well done and moves from highs to lows to adjust to the mood of the game. Surprisingly, the overall sound of the game doesn’t match the quality of the music and it actually shows more than it should. Nevertheless, it doesn’t take too much out of the game.

Overall, if you’re looking for a vampire hunting title you’re probably better off picking up one of the Castlevania titles already available for the DS. However, if the sun senor was the reason why you didn’t get into the spiritual predecessors, then this is a perfect time to see what you’ve been missing out on. Utilizing the original games you can even make use of the sensor, though you probably won’t want to. Overall 7.2/10